Additional Information

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Ladder fuels are those that will allow the fire to climb from the surface fuels into the upper portion of the tree. They can be eliminated by increasing horizontal and vertical separation between vegetation.

Ladder Fuels

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The fire season is a year-round reality, requiring firefighters and residents to be ready for the threat of wildland fire.

Each year, wildland fires consume hundreds of homes in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI). Studies show that as many as 80 percent of the homes lost to wildland fires could have been saved if their owners had followed simple fire-safe practices. In addition, wildland fire related deaths occur because people wait too long to leave their home.

Your fire department takes every precaution to help protect you and your property from wildland fire. However, in a major wildland fire event, there may simply not be enough fire resources or firefighters to defend every home.


Successfully preparing for a wildland fire enables you to takepersonal responsibility for protecting yourself, your family, and your property. 

ZONE 3

  30-100 feet around your

  home or to property line


  • ​​Create vegetation groups, “islands,” to break up continuous fuels around your home.


  • ​Remove ladder fuels to create a separation between low-level vegetation and tree branches to keep fire from climbing up trees.


  • ​​Remove leaf and needle debris from the yard.


  • ​​Keep grass and wildflowers under 8” in height.

Defensible Space Works
If you live next to a natural area, the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI), you should provide firefighters with the defensible space they need to protect your home. Create a buffer zone by removing weeds, brush and other vegetation. This helps keep the fire away from your home and reduces the risk from flying embers. Fire preparedness education programs provide valuable guidance on property enhancements.

Homes on the Wildland Boundary are at Risk too
A home within one mile of a natural areas is in the ember zone. Wind-driven embers can attack your home. You and your home must be prepared well before a fire occurs. Ember fires can destroy homes or neighborhoods far from the actual front of the wildland fire. Prepare your home with the following tips.

Consider This
Unmanaged vegetation between and around homes increases the risk of wildland fire spreading throughout the community, endangering lives and property.


Pre-fire planning, fuels management, and sufficient fuel breaks allow firefighters the space they need to keep fire from entering the community during a wildland fire event.

Defensible space is the space between a structure and the wildland area that creates a sufficient buffer to slow or halt the spread of wildland fire to a structure. It  protects the home from igniting due to direct flame or radiant heat. Defensible space is essential to protect a structure during a wildland fire. For more information about defensible space zones and preparedness techniques, visit www. firewise.org or your area’s local defensible space program’s website.


Defensible space is the required space between a structure and the wildland area that under normal conditions creates a sufficient buffer to slow or halt the spread of wildfire to a structure. It protects the home from igniting due to direct flame or radiant heat. Defensible space is essential for structure survivability during wildland fire conditions.

begins with a house that firefighters can defend


FD 7 Public Education

ZONE 1

Article Of Interest

May 8, 2015

Blaze proves the need for wildfire buffer zones


Wildfires burn with astounding heat! PEMCO partnered with Kittitas County Fire District 7 to stage a controlled burn east of Cle Elum. The objective: Demonstrate how quickly wildfire can spread on overgrown property.

​Read the rest of the story: 

Don't Get Burned!
Protect Yourself

From Wildfire

100-200 feet around your  home or to property line


  • ​Create and maintain a minimum of 10 feet between the tops of trees.


  • ​Remove ladder fuels, creating a separation between low-level vegetation and tree branches to keep fire from climbing up trees.

​​

  • ​Remove dead trees and shrubs.

ZONE 2

Contact FD7  (509) 674-5371 for additional information

0-30 feet around your home or to property line


  • Use hard surfaces such as concrete or noncombustible rock mulch 0-5 feet around home.​


  • Use non-woody, low growing herbaceous vegetation. Succulent plants and ground covers are good choices.


  • ​Store firewood and other
    combustible materials, at least  30 feet away from your home, garage, or attached deck.

​​

  • ​​Trim back touching or over hanging branches from the roof to a distance of at least 10 feet.

SAVING 

Lives and Property

through Advance Planning